Fedora 8 Re-Spin

Continuing my build out of this new workstation, I grabbed the latest re-spin from the Fedora Unity project. It installed smoothly, but like Vista, failed to recognize the new Intel network adapters. I gave the mobo’s supplied CD another chance to redeem itself to load a usable driver. To my delight, it worked! No Internet required. I never would have guessed that the earlier naming convention of e100-e1000-e1000e would not be used — instead, the driver installed as igb for Intel gigabit:

[root@localhost ~]# dmesg | grep igb
igb: eth0: igb_probe: Intel(R) Gigabit Ethernet Network Connection
igb: eth0: igb_probe: (PCIe:2.5Gb/s:Width x4) 00:30:48:7f:51:2a
igb: eth0: igb_probe: Using MSI-X interrupts. 1 rx queue(s), 1 tx queue(s)
igb: eth1: igb_probe: Intel(R) Gigabit Ethernet Network Connection
igb: eth1: igb_probe: (PCIe:2.5Gb/s:Width x4) 00:30:48:7f:51:2b
igb: eth1: igb_probe: Using MSI-X interrupts. 1 rx queue(s), 1 tx queue(s)
igb: eth0: igb_watchdog_task: NIC Link is Up 100 Mbps Full Duplex, Flow Control: RX/TX

Alas, the ATI proprietary driver installs, but is not yet usable. The open source version is working fine for regular desktop work, but no 3D for slick screensavers and games. When it becomes available, I will be certain to test its functionality and performance.

I ran a meaningful (to me) CPU benchmark of the 8-cores: I compiled SDLMAME using the make -j9 option, and it ripped through the 82MB of source code in under 15-seconds!